Events for the 2019-20 Membership Year

Annual VCLR Illustrator’s Breakfast: A Tribute to Sheila Barry
Join us in a starry tribute to the brilliant picturebook editor and publisher, the late Sheila Barry, nurturer of books such as Sidewalk Flower, Speak Norman, Speak, Small in the City, and so many more.

Featuring some of Canada’s children’s lit stars: Caroline Adderson, Linda Bailey, Sarah Ellis, Robert Heidbreder, Deborah Hodge, and Tundra editor/publisher, Tara Walker.

We will also be formally announcing the new Sheila Barry Best Canadian Picturebook of the Year Award.

We welcome donations to help us cover the cost of offering reduced rates to students. Vancouver Kidsbooks will be on hand to sell books.

We are also holding a silent auction of great books, illustrations, and items related to picturebooks and children’s literature.

8:00 am – 12:00 pm | November 16, 2019 | University Golf Course

Early Bird Rates end October 20, 2019
Registration closes November 13, 2019


Celebrate! Award-Winning B.C. Children’s Writers and Illustrators
A celebration of BC award winning children’s authors and illustrators of 2019. The guest speaker will be the winner of the 2019 Information Book Award (the winner will be announced November 16, 2019 at the Illustrator’s Breakfast).

Wednesday, January 29, 2020, 6:30 – 9:30 pm
Free to members. Bubbly beverages and appetizers at the University Golf Club.


Special Picturebook Event
June 2020
Stay tuned . . . more details to come!

Register online here or download a mail-in registration form here.


Don’t forget that except where noted, these are member-only events. Don’t miss out. Please make sure your membership is up-to-date. Renew your VCLR membership here.

The 2019 Information Book Award Shortlist is out!

The Children’s Literature Roundtables of Canada Announce…

2019 Information Book Award Shortlist

(Eight terrific non-fiction titles published in 2018, listed alphabetically)

Bloom: A story of fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. By Kyo Maclear. Illustrated by Julie Morstad. Published by Tundra Books.

Mary Who Wrote Frankenstein. By Linda Bailey. Illustrations by Julia Sarda. Published by Tundra Books.

Out of the Ice: How climate change is revealing the past. By Claire Eamer. Illustrated by Drew Shannon. Published by Kids Can Press.

Ramadan: The holy month of fasting. By Ausma Zehanat Khan. Published by Orca Book Publishers.

Too Young to Escape: A Vietnamese girl waits to be reunited with her family. By Van Ho and Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch. Published by Pajama Press.

The Triumphant Tale of the House Sparrow. By JanThornhill. Published by Groundwood Books.

The True Tale of a Giantess: The story of Anna Swan. By Anne Renaud. Illustrated by Marie Lafrance. Published by Kids Can Press.

Wild Buildings and Bridges: Architecture inspired by nature. By Etta Kaner and Carl Wiens. Published by Kids Can Press.

Information Book Award Jury: Brooklyn Cribdon, Vicki Donoghue, Sarah Fast, Lauren Hathaway, Meghan Ross, Natalie Schembri, Lonestar Stone, Fiona Trotter, and Michelle Yule. Chair: Danielle Wing

ROUNDTABLES VOTING DEADLINE: OCTOBER 31, 2019

WINNER ANNOUNCEMENT: 16 NOVEMBER 2019

PRESENTATION OF AWARD: 29, JANUARY 2020

FURTHER INFORMATION/ VOTING SUBMISSIONS: [email protected]

The MACL program is turning 20!

You’re invited to the 20th Anniversary of the MA in Children’s Literature program at UBC iSchool!

Hear from author Kenneth Oppel, a Governor General’s Award winner, world-renowned children’s book historian Leonard Marcus, and professor emerita Judith Saltman, the heart and soul of the Children’s Literature program from its inception. We’ll be recognizing the achievements of alumni, faculty, and the vibrant children’s literature community that has grown and developed thanks to this program.

Details:

Date: March 2, 2019 
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 pm 
Jack Poole Hall at the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre (UBC, Point Grey Campus)

The even is free but RSVP is required

Announcing the 2018 Information Book Award Winner

Thank you to everyone who took the time and made the effort to participate in the voting process for the 2018 Information Book Award. The award will be presented at our celebration event on January 30, 2019.

Winner of the 2018 Information Book Award

Winner
Speaking Our Truth: A Journey of Reconciliation, by Monique Gray Smith. Published by Orca Book Publishers .

The 2018 Information Book Award honour book

Honour Book
Eyes & Spies: How You’re Tracked, and Why You Should Know, by Tanya Lloyd Kyi.  Illustrated by Belle Wuthrich. Published by Annick Press

 

Celebrate Award-Winning BC Children’s Authors and Illustrators 2019

You Are Invited To A Celebration of Award-Winning BC Children’s Authors and Illustrators

Be prepared to mingle and chat with over 20 of BC’s best writers and authors, and to participate in our fun silent auction.

With special guest Monique Gray Smith winner of the Children’s Literature Roundtables of Canada 2018 Information Book Award for her book
Speaking Our Truth: A Journey of Reconciliation.

When: January 30, 2019, 7 – 9 pm. Doors open at 6:30 pm.

Where: UBC Golf Club

What: Bubbly and appetizers | Silent Auction

Cost: Free to members and students.

Register now to confirm your seat and update your membership.

Jobe Scholarship Winners Announced!

We fêted three Masters of Arts in Children’s Literature students this year! Congratulations to Elizabeth Leung, Shanleigh Klassen, and Corey Liu, winners of the 2018 Ronald Jobe Scholarship for their achievement. They received formal recognition of this honour at the VCLR Illustrators Breakfast with guest speakers Holman Wang, Sara Gillingham, and Lee Edward Fodi on October 13th, 2018.

Past winners

Spotlight on Sara Gillingham

Sara Gillingham will be speaking and demonstrating her craft at the Annual 2018 Illustrator’s Breakfast on October 13. We asked a few questions to get to know her better. Here’s what she had to say . . .

Is there an art medium you have never tried but always wanted to? If you could, what would you do with it?

Watercolor! I’d love to make super loose, gestural character drawings – something totally different from my usual work.

Do you have a special place that you go to for inspiration? Tell us about it and why it works?

First – I go to where the children are (which, lucky for me, is my home!) – they are a constant and primary source of inspiration: how they think, what matters to them, how they draw. My second favorite place for inspiration is flea markets or my collection of vintage children’s books. I love seeing the way that people made and packaged things before the age of plastic mass-production we are in now. The materials, color palettes and typography that were used 50-60 years ago often inspire the textures and colors I use in my work.

What other jobs have you done besides children’s book illustrator?

I have (and still am) an art director and designer in children’s book publishing. I have also taught children’s book illustration at the university level and to continuing education students. Back in the old days, some other jobs I had were: substitute teacher, fabric store sales clerk, bead-party-lady, hotel front desk clerk, waitress, children’s-clothing-store clerk, tutor. As a child, I was an entrepreneur and started my own: library, stretch-pant business, jewelry business, stationery business.

Is there a children’s book illustrator whose artwork you absolutely adore and why?

There are so many incredible illustrators working today whose work I love, it is impossible to pick one. If I’m allowed to go back in time, I’d say that Bruno Munari is one of my all-time favorite illustrators. He really understood book-making and brought an elegance to children’s book design that has inspired generations of bookmakers.

Tell us about a museum or art gallery that you have visited that you really enjoyed and would recommend to others.

The Nordic Museum in Seattle, The Bethnal Green Museum of Childhood in London, The Nuremburg Toy Museum, The new Whitney Museum in New York.

What was your favourite book as a child?

I can never pick one! Professor Wormbog in Search of the Zipperumpa Zoo by Mercer Meyer, The Tale of Two Bad Mice by Beatrix Potter, Blueberries for Sal by Robert McCloskey.

Spotlight on Lee Edward Fodi

Lee Edward Fodi will be speaking and demonstrating his craft at the Annual 2018 Illustrator’s Breakfast on October 13. We asked him a few questions to get to know him better. Here’s what he had to say . . .

Is there an art medium you have never tried but always wanted to? If you could, what would you do with it?

I think it would be collage. One of my favorite picture books as a child is Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears; I still adore that book, especially the artwork. I would probably take my cue from that book and do something with collage that involved a folktale or an artsy picture book with a poetic narrative.

Do you have a special place that you go to for inspiration? Tell us about it and why it works?

For me, inspiration is everywhere, but sometimes I do travel to specific places. For example, at the beginning of this year I specifically went to Halong Bay in Vietnam because I knew it would be key to developing a world in a book I’m working on. When I’m at home, however, and feeling a little stuck, I take my notebook and go for a walk along the seawall.

What other jobs have you done besides children’s book illustrator?

Author and educator—I teach creative writing and deliver art therapy programming to at-risk teens. I used to work full time as a graphic designer and now I still do a bit of that work for some of my author friends and for my students. I used to wonder if I was an illustrator who writes or a writer who illustrates, but now I define myself as a writer whose process involves drawing, doodling, and propbuilding. For me, the boundaries between illustration and writing keep getting blurred.

Is there a children’s book illustrator whose artwork you absolutely adore and why?

I can’t name just one! Skottie Young, Tony DiTerlizzi, and Chris Ridell are some of my favourites. I was really excited to see that Neil Gaiman’s book Fortunately, the Milk was illustrated by Chris Ridell for the UK edition and Skottie Young for the North American version. In particular I love Skottie Young’s style because it is mischievously whimsical, cartoonish, and detailed all at the same time.

Tell us about a museum or art gallery that you have visited that you really enjoyed and would recommend to others.

I have gone to many museums and galleries specifically as part of research for my books. Two specific galleries stick with me; one is the Musee d’Orsay in Paris because it is in an old converted train station and really reminded me of Hugo Cabret. So, the setting itself is beautiful, but it is also just one of the art galleries that is manageable and you can do it in a day. The other art gallery that I have a vivid memory of is the Chicago Art Institute. In addition to seeing many classic works such as Seurat’s Sunday at La Grande Jatte, there was also an excellent children’s illustration exhibit featuring original works by Eric Carle.

What was your favourite book as a child?

I already mentioned Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears, but when people ask me this question I inevitably think of the Oz series, partly because of the bizarre characters and settings, but also largely because of the design and illustration of those books, which is very art deco in their inflection. All but the first book in the series were illustrated by John R. Neill and I really loved how the illustration, typography, and design were combined to help invite readers into Baum’s worlds.

Spotlight on Holman Wang

Holman Wang will be speaking and demonstrating his craft at the Annual 2018 Illustrator’s Breakfast on October 13. We asked him a few questions to get to know him better. Here’s what he had to say . . .

Is there an art medium you have never tried but always wanted to? If you could, what would you do with it?

Digital illustration! My work is so tactile and materials-based that sometimes I fantasize about creating art “virtually.” No scrounging for materials, no mess, no clean-up! I dream about producing a graphic novel.

Do you have a special place that you go to for inspiration? Tell us about it and why it works?

I learned somewhere once that non-verbal, repetitive, physical action spurs creativity. I’ve found this to be true, as I often get my best ideas just walking my dog around the neighbourhood. I walk along the tree-lined streets of Grandview-Woodland, an area which I love.

What other jobs have you done besides children’s book illustrator?

I have been a lawyer since 2006, and am still currently practicing. I’ve also taught ESL, worked in the marketing department for the Arts Club Theatre Company, and worked as a Customs Inspector at YVR.

Tell us about a museum or art gallery that you have visited that you really enjoyed and would recommend to others.

I love the Beaty Biodiversity Museum out at UBC. It has over two million specimens (mostly in drawers), as well as an 82-foot skeleton of a female blue that was once buried in PEI (which happens to be the subject of a picture book by a friend). My kids love the museum, too.

What was your favourite book as a child?

I loved a curious little classic called Hands, Hands, Fingers, Thumb (“One thumb, one thumb, drumming on a drum.”). When I got older, I was obsessed with a book called The Big Book of Amazing Facts. Kidlit non-fiction at its best!